SAMPLE YEAR 1 SCHEDULE
2009-2010 School Year

Theme: God created the earth as a special place to be inhabited.
(ref. Gen 1:1, Is 45:18)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

08:00 am Morning chores & breakfast
08:30 am Prayer & Language Arts Study
09:00 am Language Arts Scripture copying
09:15 am Independent Study: Phonics Worksheets
09:30 am Mathematics
10:15 am Piano
10:45 am Break
11:00 am Indoor chores & lunch preparation
12:00 pm Lunch & clean up
1:00 pm Quiet time
2:00 pm Mother's Spanish studies (Hannah picked up some grammar, etc.)
2:45 pm and onward--
        *physical activity, e.g., walk
        *dinner preparation
        *outdoor chores (e.g., gardening & weeding)
        *free time (sewing, etc.)
        *piano practice
        *dinner

Tuesday

08:00 am Morning chores & breakfast
08:30 am Prayer & Ancient History Study
09:00 am Ancient History Scripture copying
09:15 am Mathematics
10:00 am Penmanship (Manuscript & Cursive Workbooks)
10:30 am Piano
11:00 am Break
11:15 am Indoor chores & lunch preparation
12:00 pm Lunch & clean up
1:00 pm Quiet time
2:00 pm ...onward...
        *physical activity, e.g., walk
        *dinner preparation
        *outdoor chores (e.g., gardening & weeding)
        *free time (sewing, etc.)
        *dinner
        *piano lesson

Gospel Thursday

08:00 am Morning chores & breakfast
08:30 am Prayer & Chapel
9:00 Gospel Reading
09:30 am Science (Gen 1:1-2:7 memory & copy memory verse)
09:45 am Science (Topic & worksheet, etc.)
10:15 am Mathematics
11:00 am Piano
11:30 am Break
11:45 am Indoor chores & lunch preparation
12:00 pm Lunch & clean up
1:00 pm Quiet time
2:00 pm ...onward...
        *physical activity, e.g., walk or trip to the farm
        *dinner preparation
        *outdoor chores (e.g., gardening & weeding)
        *free time (sewing, etc.)
        *piano practice
        *dinner


This page is a work in progress. I may be adding to the notes below.

Notes:

  • The object of this sample schedule is to show how the Green Sheets are used within the context of the school day. Schedules let us know where we are going, however, they are not inflexible.
  • What you see is similar to the schedule I created for Hannah except she had another workbook or two which I do not feel were worthwhile, but maybe they were--Health and Manners from Rod & Staff is the one that I remember.
  • On Thursdays we had chapel where we prayed, sang songs sometimes with Hannah playing the piano, gave testimonies, read a missionary story or perhaps a story of the persecuted church (Voice of the Martyrs "Link Up," "Kids of Courage," etc. --I eventually unsubscribed to their newsletters around 2008 when I came across more and more stories presenting Catholics as Christians). It was also on Thursdays, I believe, that we did our read alouds, which we both found very enjoyable. These included, "Mary Jones and Her Bible" (about a chapter a week) and the biography of George Washington Carver--an interestingly written book written especially for children. Hannah was four when we read Mary Jones and it had a lot of big words in it. I don't know if I knew them all, but she didn't ask for explanations and I didn't offer them. Every once in a while if I felt something needed to be explained, I would, but that was not often. Helen Keller said that she did not like it when her teacher tried to explain too many words. Context is a great and easy teacher. Mary Jones and Her Bible is online for free at books.google.com.
  • I completed some afternoon Spanish lessons for much of the year until they proved too much--an overload on Hannah as she tried to keep up with me and death to me because of the format but she did get some good grammar teachings that stuck (had a short overview of verb conjugation in our classroom at the beginning of the year and she watched the DVDs with me and picked up a lot there but it got to the point where her head was swimming from trying to process all that information. I sent the rented DVDs back to A Beka well before the expiration time--and was glad to do it.). It would in year 2 that a miraculous breakthrough would come in the area of Spanish. I would like to one day upload that teaching.
  • Gospel Thursday was originally, "God is Love Day". How God is Love Day came about: I had seen the results of children that had the scriptures forced on them by perhaps well-meaning parents. They were basically not permitted to do anything but sit. I wanted Hannah to know that God is loving and cares. After completing The Survey of the Gospels I understood that we could not just go through the rest of the Bible and neglect the gospel of our precious Saviour. We could never get far away from him. And so God is Love Day became Gospel Thursday where we read from the gospels--a chapter, two or three--starting from Matthew and making our way through Mark, Luke, and John. We eventually added Acts and Romans to this cycle.) It was on this day that we tried to go on fieldtrips and do things out of the ordinary.
  • Seatwork is completed during class time. Any corrections that need to be made to graded work serves as homework (after I grade, errors must be corrected.).
  • Schedules are good to have even if you make changes. They give form to what you are doing.
  • Before the beginning of the school year, I write down our goals and objectives for the upcoming year. I may upload this form.
  • Grading system for Year 1--S for satisfactory, NS for not satisfactory. In Year 2 I found grading useful in Mathematics. Eventually, I'd find it useful for her Language Arts--that will be explained in Year 5. I have always issued report cards and have found them useful [High school, we use grading system; however, Physical Education was Pass/Fail]. I also fill out Quarterly Reports (issued at the same time as report cards) with detailed information on what we studied that quarter, our achievements, our challenges. It has also often included a deportment section. It has been very useful to look back and assess where we've come from and plan for where we are going.
  • We did not start out following the schedule on Day 1. Our first week of school was a fun Orientation Week (it had its own schedule). This was an orientation to the whole, big world. My daughter was four, but this would be helpful to most Americans because we are poor at geography. It helped me.
  • Beginning with Year 1, we had a School Year Kickoff. Here is how that came about. When Hannah was four, we were in her room. She stood up straight and tall and talked about going to school soon. I was sitting on the floor. I told her she would not go to school. She felt that she could hold her own. I told her, "Those teachers are not going to teach you the way that Mother will teach you." That satisfied her and she never asked about it again. It was that day that I knew that our school was not going to be business as usual, just staying around the house. It was going to be a real school a separate and distinct entity. We had a kickoff in August to get us geared up for the school year which started the beginning of September. Our kickoffs also opened up the world to us--
    • petting farm
    • the beach
    • caverns
    • frontier museum

    We also had our "feast of booths" the first week of classes--we set up a big popup tent indoors and slept inside of it. We had end-of-the-year festivities--banquets and trips. In Year 4 we went on our "Independence Tour" of Philadelphia after studying U.S. History and the Constitution for a year.

    We even opened up the world with family trips. Jamestowne, the ocean and the transatlantic slave trade, etc.

  • By God's appointment, the course of study that we have taken has opened up all things. What seems like too much material to those outside of our school, is not. We live a simple, basic life. When something is given to us, we pick it up and go back to our simple life. God will put you in tune to what you are supposed to do and it is not grievous. Through our school, I've found a whole new sort of life.
  • Along the way, we've had a number of special teachings in our school for various subjects-- Language Arts, Spanish, Mathematics, etc. Some of these may be forthcoming. You can make your own as led.
  • Hannah was a reader. At five, she was reading the testimonies that I was. It got out of hand. Too many books. She'd get in a corner, inhale a book and in a short time was finished. I didn't know about all the knitting, etc. and was in no way interested in it when my sister-in-law said that she wanted to know domestic duties--and like it. I thought domestic duties were to be gotten out of the way so I could get to "other things". Reasons I got the Mennonite books: (1) So that she could see a Christian family with a saved father, mother, and children. (2) So that she could eventually be warned against no-good men so that she would be wary and not marry one. The books fulfilled my expectations. Not all Rod & Staff books are good. If God allows me to, I'll list a choice few. Hannah's reading still has to be controlled. Reading can be addictive and make us not want to do anything else but get comfortable and read. Hannah opens up her whole soul to the process. As I have told her, this is dangerous. She is not permitted to read freely.
  • Phonics was an independent study where Hannah completed maybe two easy phonics worksheets that utilize simple rules. Every once in a while I come across intelligently written materials of this sort. If I had it to do again, I think I would create my own simple worksheets. I will note that if you do this, you do not have to write a whole book at once. Prepare them as needed (that morning) and don't let your scholar write on them. When you have finished your series, bind them together and use it over and over again. This will solidify baseline information. There do not have to be enough for a whole school year. Just a small collection of EASY, USEFUL exercises, perhaps without any grammar explanation. This is a four or five year old. They do NOT need to be bogged down with useless, confusing rules, (only sound grammar rules). Nobody does!

    I did not fill up my daughter's time with busy work. It was not my object to bring the public school system into my home. Work (school is not work) is a very important Bible doctrine. The scriptures have plenty to say about the diligent and the sluggard. And that is not just in the Old Testament. We are to study to be quiet and do our own business. As I move about, she is to move about.

  • Hannah had placemats that introduced a number of subjects. She had one of the solar system but knew that the earth is separate and distinct from the planets ("wanderers"). At the table she would look at it and at the placemat with a map of the United States. She also had a puzzle of the United States, which she became proficient at putting together. I did not make her memorize these things.

    see our index page for how we used the Authorized King James Version of the Bible in our sanctified homeschool.